About Dr Theresa Bidwell

QUALIFICATIONS AND TRAINING

Dr Bidwell completed her New Zealand Orthopaedic training (FRACS Orth) in 2003. She then completed fellowship training in Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgery and Paediatric Hand Surgery at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital in Dallas, Texas. This allowed her to gain experience working with International experts in these areas. She also spent a year working in Australia, gaining further experience in Trauma and Upper Limb surgery.

EXPERIENCE

Dr Bidwell has worked at The Starship Children’s Hospital in Auckland as a Specialist since 2006.

She has extensive experience treating general Paediatric Orthopaedic conditions such as those following injury and congenital or developmental problems.

She is also the Co-Director of the Regional Children’s Hand and Upper Limb Service at Starship. She provides sub specialist care to children with traumatic injuries of the hand and upper limb, congenital upper limb problems, brachial plexus birth injuries and cerebral palsy. She works in conjunction with several Plastic Surgeons, a Physiotherapy Team, Occupational Therapists and Orthotists to provide comprehensive care when a multidisciplinary approach is required.

CONTINUING EDUCATION

Dr Bidwell has gained a International network of professional contacts in Paediatrics and Children’s Upper Limb problems due to her Fellowship experience and ongoing education. She considers continuing education to be very important and is committed to attending several International meetings each year in her field to ensure that she can apply the best practices to the conditions she treats. This also gives her the opportunity to discuss complex cases at the highest level and seek further advice when necessary.

TEACHING

She is also involved in teaching Paediatric Orthopaedics to other Orthopaedic Surgeons and trainees in the Australasia.

GLOBAL SURGERY

Dr Bidwell joined Medicines sans Frontières (MSF) in 2015. She has worked at MSF Hospitals in Afghanistan and Haiti providing acute trauma care to distressed populations.